Other Energy

al·ter·na·tive en·er·gy

  • Energy generated in ways that do not deplete natural resources or harm the environment, especially by avoiding the use of fossil fuels .

Renewable energy is energy derived from natural processes that are replenished at a rate that is equal to or faster than the rate at which they are consumed. There are various forms of renewable energy, deriving directly or indirectly from the sun, or from heat generated deep within the earth. They include energy generated from solar, wind, geothermal, hydropower and ocean resources, solid biomass, biogas and liquid biofuels. Biomass, however, is a renewable resource only if its rate of consumption does not exceed its rate of regeneration.


A wide range of energy-producing technologies and equipment have been developed over time to take advantage of these natural resources. As a result, usable energy can be produced in the form of electricity, industrial heat, thermal energy for space and water conditioning, and transportation fuels.

With its large landmass and diversified geography, Canada has an abundance of renewable resources that can be used to produce energy. Canada is a world leader in the production and use of energy from renewable resources. Renewable energy resources currently provide 18.9 per cent of Canada’s total primary energy supply.

Hydroelectricity is by far the most important form of renewable energy produced in Canada. Wind and bioenergy also make an important contribution to Canada’s energy mix. Wind and solar photovoltaic power are experiencing the highest growth rates.